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Events & Exhibits: Fall 2016 Brown Bag Talks

Marvelous Math Club

Thursday, September 8

12 - 1 PM

Ramsey Library Special Collections 

Sam Kaplan, Department of Mathematics

 

Marvelous Math Club: join us as Sam Kaplan discusses math literacy week and the community outreach the math department is doing with public housing.

 

Dynamic Management of Electrical Generation

Thursday, September 15

12 - 1 PM

Ramsey Library Special Collections 

Evan Couzo, Department of Education

 

Join Evan Couzo as he discusses his recent publication, "Modeled response of ozone to electricity generation emissions in the northeastern United States using three sensitivity techniques," published in the Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association.

Abstract:

Electrical generation units (EGUs) are important sources of nitrogen oxides (NOx) that contribute to ozone air pollution. A dynamic management system can anticipate high ozone and dispatch EGU generation on a daily basis to attempt to avoid violations, temporarily scaling back or shutting down EGUs that most influence the high ozone while compensating for that generation elsewhere. Here we investigate the contributions of NOx from individual EGUs to high daily ozone, with the goal of informing the design of a dynamic management system.

Dynamic management of electrical generation has the potential to meet daily ozone air quality standards at low cost. We show that dynamic management can be effective at reducing ozone, as EGU contributions are important and as the number of EGUs that contribute to high ozone in a given location is small (<6). For two high ozone days and seven geographic regions, EGUs would best be shut down or their production scaled back roughly 1.5 days before the forecasted exceedance. Including online sensitivity techniques in an air quality forecasting model can provide timely and useful information on which EGUs would be most beneficial to shut down or scale back temporarily.

Diálogo de saberes: the five cardinal points in contemporary indigenous literatures

Thursday, September 22

12 - 1 PM

Ramsey Library Special Collections 

Juan Sanchez Martinez,  Department of Modern Languages and Literatures

 

Linguistic experimentation—the efforts in exploring other epistemologies while switching the codes—and the holistic methodology, braiding science, art, and spirituality, are some features of contemporary indigenous expressions which are questioning the canonical literatures of English, Spanish and French. Similarly, the project of using native concepts in critical reading, borrowed from indigenous languages and ontologies, is currently challenging education in the Humanities, which once offered unambiguous definitions for writing and for literature. In this talk, we will discuss about the contributions of the last issue of the Diálogo magazine, "The five cardinal points in contemporary indigenous literatures” (19.1. Spring 2016).

 

The Silver Boa: Discovery of a Remarkable New Species from the Bahamas

Thursday, September 29

12 - 1 PM

Ramsey Library Special Collections 

Graham Reynolds,  Department of Biology

Join Graham Reynolds as he discusses the expedition that led to the discovery of a new species of boa in a remote part of the Bahamas.

Billy Schumann

Thursday, October 6

12 - 1 PM

Ramsey Library Special Collections

Billy Schumann, Director of the Center for Appalachian Studies at Appalachian State University

Dr. William Schumann has taught and conducted research in Appalachia's southern, central, and northern sub-regions. Based on this experience, he will discuss strategies for engaging with Appalachian communities to develop community-based resources in partnership with universities and other stakeholders. In particular, Dr. Schumann will provide examples of successful student-led research projects as well as highlight the challenges to inclusive, sustainable community development in Appalachia.

Dr. Schumann will also discuss graduate opportunities in the Appalachian Studies program at ASU.

"Been there, done that:" Alumni support of our first generation and ALANA college students

Thursday, October 13

12 - 1 PM

Ramsey Library Special Collections

Tracey Rizzo (Department of History), Marquis McGee (Advising and Learning Support), and Asia Sheppard (Advising and Learning Support)

This panel will explore the impact of alumni support for ALANA and first-generation college students-in-transition at the University of North Carolina at Asheville (UNCA). ALANA and/or first generation students themselves, the panelists have been active in implementing a variety of strategies that have successfully supported traditionally underserved populations, including pell-eligible students. As we describe these strategies--which range from enhanced advising and mentoring to special sections of the first-year colloquium--we will highlight the role of alumni who work as professional educators full time or as occasional consultants at their alma maters.

The UNC-Asheville Drama Department's production of Marat/Sade: A process.

Thursday, October 20

12 - 1 PM

Ramsey Library Special Collections

Robert Bowen, Department of Drama

This talk will focus on the process taken to create the production of Marat/Sade; from the reasons why this production was chosen to the collaborative efforts of the creative team, cast and crew, and the expectations for opening night. 

Analytic Jurisprudence and the Planning Theory of Law

Thursday, October 27

12 - 1 PM

Ramsey Library Special Collections

Grace Campbell, Humanities Program

Grace Campbell will discuss the basic ideas in a paper she will present in 2017 on positivist legal theory, a branch of analytic jurisprudence. Analytic legal philosophy seeks to explain what law is and why those subject to it have an obligation to obey. Such simple questions are increasingly complicated by the global diversity of legal systems.  The sheer variety of legal concepts poses new line-drawing challenges in the attempt to distinguish law from non-law.

The Planning Thesis, a version of exclusive legal positivism, makes a radical departure from well-known natural law theories in demarcating what law is and is not. While law can sometimes track morality, there is no necessary connection between the legal and the moral. Instead, legality is strictly social planning we have accepted for the purpose of solving coordination problems. Introduced in 2010, the planning view and is now advanced by top legal theory centers at Yale and Oxford. In the brown bag conversation Grace will share her argument against the planning view and explain how it fails to solve the “normativity problem” in law.

Sultana’s Dream: Feminist Consciousness through a Bengali Muslim Lens

Thursday, November 10

12 - 1 PM

Ramsey Library Special Collections

Keya Maitra, Department of Philosophy

Sultana’s Dream: Feminist Consciousness through a Bengali Muslim Lens

Abstract:

At least 10 years before Charlotte Perkins Gilman publishes Herland--often considered the first feminist utopian writing within Western feminist context, Rokeya Sekhawat Hossain-- a Bengali Muslim woman—published Sultana’s Dream in 1905. Targeting the purdah & zenana faced by women of late 19th and early 20th century Bengal, Rokeya imagines the utopian place of Ladyland that her main character Sultana encounters in her dream. Countering her male dominated society, Rokeya conceives Ladyland as “a technologically advanced world where men are confined to the zenana & women guarantee complete freedom.” The general goal of my paper is to explore how Rokeya’s utopian science fiction can be considered a feminist text.

Drawing from Sandra Bartky’s 1995 article “Toward a Phenomenology of Feminist Consciousness,” we can identify three features of feminist consciousness: (1) feminist consciousness is transformative since it effects a shift in a woman’s cognitive, emotional and physical behavior; (2) it is at least partially liberatory, because it establishes change and liberation as real goals; and (3) in its active moral dimension, it can be taken as not merely self-directed but essentially other and world-directed. Therefore, an awareness of the powers and structures that have worked to limit women is at the heart of feminist consciousness. Further, as Bartky observes, it allows feminists to understand what they are and where they are “in the light of what [they] are not yet.” My working conclusion is that Sultana’s Dream reflects strong representation of these three features of feminist consciousness: transformative, liberatory in its goals and aimed at changing the wider structure of social reality. Rokeya’s portrayal of women and their empowerment in Ladyland does come to represent feminist consciousness. Indeed, it thus reflects strong ‘feminist sentiments’ growing from ‘indigenous roots.’

POSTPONED until January 2017: The STEAM studio @ the RAMP: An Introduction

POSTPONED UNTIL JANUARY 2017

Thursday, November 17

12 - 1 PM

Ramsey Library Special Collections

Brent Skidmore, Department of Art and Art History

Join Brent Skidmore for a discussion on UNCA's new STEAM studio @ the RAMP. He will will give an introduction to the team's work and provide updates on faculty developments.