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Events & Exhibits: Fall 2019 Brown Bag Talks

Fall 2019 Brown Bag Talks

Library Brown Bag Talks are free and open to UNC Asheville students, faculty, and staff as well as the Asheville community. Feel free to bring your lunch. Light refreshments are always served.

For questions or comments about Library Brown Bag Talks, please contact Gene Hyde, Head of Special Collections and University Archivist, UNC Asheville. ghyde@unca.edu or 828-251-6645

"Accessibility to Universal Education to all students"

Thursday, August 29

12 - 1 PM

Ramsey Library Special Collections

Florence Akua Mensah, Fulbright Visiting Scholar, University of Winneba, Ghana

"Accessibility to Universal Education to all students"

Education is widely accepted to be a fundamental resource, both for individuals and societies. Roser and Ortiz-Ospina (2019) mention that indeed, in most countries education is nowadays perceived not only as a right, but also as a duty rendering governments typically expected to ensure access to basic education, while citizens are often required by law to attain education up to a certain basic level hence, making universal access to education become a global concern. In the United States for instance, the federal and state government is covering the cost of free public education though this has become a contested topic because of the provision of a clear cut guide line to achieve that thus creating a gap. Similarly Africa is not cut out on this as its being signatories to several opportunities and treaties including Education For All (EFA) amongst the lot thus, has accommodations to offer free compulsory education just like in the case of Ghana and currently all-inclusive education by  September 2019 with curricular enhancement and support systems for educators. However, Thirani Bagri (2016) has it that, the Global Education Monitoring (GEM) Report by United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) shows that economic inequality will keep the world from achieving education for all anytime soon. Meanwhile, 2017 World Bank Report on tertiary education has it that, a number of countries have undertaken major restructuring of their tertiary education systems to enhance their reach and effectiveness. However, progress has been uneven. Countries across the world need to ensure that their national policies prioritize equitable access, improved learning, efficient retention, and increased assurance of the success of all qualified students, regardless of background into higher education. Though there is scanty literature on universal education at the higher School level, the Department of Special Education, University of Education, Winneba - Ghana has since over two decades offered  support service through Unit Centers to students with special needs and others alike who have gained admission to study in there. This presentation highlights the services offered by the various Centers to students with special needs in the University.

"Tapping into Creativity: The 48 Hour Film Project"

Thursday, September 12

12 - 1 PM

Ramsey Library Special Collections

Anne Slatton, Mass Communication

"Tapping into Creativity: The 48 Hour Film Project"

The 48HFP is the world's oldest and largest timed filmmaking competition. It is a wild and sleepless weekend in which teams make a movie - write, shoot, and edit - in just 48 hours. On Friday night, teams draw a genre from a hat. They are then given a character, prop and line to include in their films. On Sunday night the film is turned in and later screened at a local theater.

Anne Slatton has been the team leader and director of Team UNCA, an ever-changing group of UNCA students and alumnae, since 2007. The team has won many awards over the years, including Best Film, and has gone on to compete in the international competition three times. Come find out about the process, hear some behind the scenes “horror stories”, and see our latest film.

"Submit It: A Crash Course in Publishing Creative Work in Literary Journals and Magazines"

Thursday, September 19

12 - 1 PM

Ramsey Library Special Collections

Jennifer McGaha, Department of English

"Submit It: A Crash Course in Publishing Creative Work in Literary Journals and Magazines"

 

Publishing stories, poems, essays, and other creative works in literary journals and magazines may enhance your resume and increase your chances of landing an agent, a book deal, or a job. Publishing can also be just plain rewarding. However, with all the options out there, finding the right home for your work may seem daunting. During this hour, we will explore some of the tools available for helping you find the best places for your work. We will also discuss submission etiquette, how to stay motivated through a process that inevitably involves rejection, and some common pitfalls to avoid during the submission process. Writers of all levels are welcome for this discussion. 

"Behind the Scenes of UNC Asheville's Brand Refresh"

Thursday, September 26

12 - 1 PM

Ramsey Library Special Collections

Sarah Broberg, Communication and Marketing

"Behind the Scenes of UNC Asheville's Brand Refresh"
 
Please join the UNC Asheville Communication & Marketing team for an engaging discussion about the University's brand refresh to more effectively increase awareness of UNC Asheville and our points of pride to support student and faculty recruitment. 
 
We will share insights from the market research and assessments, focus group discussions and conversations with many faculty, staff, students, trustees, alumni, and community members that are shaping the University's brand refresh and positioning narrative. 
 
Learn how we are working with faculty, staff and students toward a more cohesive brand identity to showcase UNC Asheville's academic quality and rigor, and claim our rightful place as THE nationally-recognized public liberal arts and sciences university in the region and beyond.

"Disability in Medieval Christian Philosophy and Theology"

Thursday, October 10

12 - 1 PM

Ramsey Library Special Collections

Scott Williams, Department of Philosophy

Disability Studies has been growing in several disciplines over the last few decades. We find disability advocacy (a political movement), disability in literature, disability in legal studies, disability in sociology and anthropology, disability in religion and theology, disability in history, and philosophy of disability (often regarding normative questions). In this talk I will introduce a new intersection between philosophy of disability and a history of philosophy and theology, namely, Disability in Medieval Christian Philosophy and Theology. This is the title of a forthcoming book that I have edited (to be published by Routledge) and to which I have contributed a chapter (chapter 3). I will introduce the aims of this book and some of the findings. These findings open up new areas of research in medieval philosophy and theology, and can contribute to contemporary normative debates. Instead of a description of all of the chapters, I give here a list of the titles of the ten chapters that signals the topics that I will discuss.

Part 1: Theoretical Frameworks

Chapter 1 “Plurality in Medieval Concepts of Disability” 

 

Part 2: Disability in this Life

Chapter 2 “Medieval Aristotelians on Congenital Disabilities and their Early Modern Critics” Chapter 3 “Personhood, Ethics, and Disability Before and After Original Sin”

Chapter 4 “The Imago Dei/Trinitatis and Disabled Persons: The Limitations of Intellectualism in 

Late Medieval Theology”

Chapter 5 “Deafness and Disability”

Chapter 6 “Intellectual Disability, Spanish Colonialism, and the Disappearance of a Medieval 

Account of Persons who Lack the Use of Reason”

Chapter 7 “Taking the ‘Dis’ out of Disability: Martyrs, Mothers, and Mystics in the Middle Ages”

 

Part 3: Disability in the Afterlife

Chapter 8 “Separated Souls: Disability in the Intermediate State”

Chapter 9 “Disability and Resurrection”

Chapter 10 “Relative Disability and Transhuman Happiness: St. Thomas Aquinas on the Beatific 

Vision”

 

Amanda Wray

Thursday, October 17

12 - 1 PM

Ramsey Library Special Collections

Amanda Wray, Department of English

The title and description of this Brown Bag Talk will be available soon!

"Two Real-World Physics Applications: Road Mirages and Eyeglasses for Myopia"

Thursday, October 24

12 - 1 PM

Ramsey Library Special Collections

Michael Ruiz, Department of Physics

"Two Real-World Physics Applications: Road Mirages and Eyeglasses for Myopia"

Photos and videos will be shown to illustrate road mirages and virtual images formed by eyeglasses for myopic eyes. The road mirage angle for a mirage of an orange sign on a highway will be calculated with data obtained from a video taken during the ride in the car. Then, the eyeglass prescription for actor Joe Pantoliano will be estimated from a scene in the movie "Memento" (2000) where he talks to Guy Pearce. This research was undertaken to analyze interesting real-life applications of physics for students. Two papers will appear in the international peer-reviewed academic journal Physics Education, published by the Institute of Physics Publishing, United Kingdom.
 

"Bulldog Athletics 101 with Janet Cone and Brenda Kirkpatrick"

Thursday, October 31

12 - 1 PM

Ramsey Library Special Collections

"Bulldog Athletics 101 with Janet Cone and Brenda Kirkpatrick

Join Athletic Director Janet Cone and Women's Basketball Coach Brenda Kirkpatrick for "Bulldog Athletics 101!" 

"Reconstructing Ancient Battles: History, Topography, and Technology"

Thursday, November 14

12 - 1 PM

Ramsey Library Special Collections

Jacob Butera, Department of Classics 

"Reconstructing Ancient Battles:  History, Topography, and Technology"

Using historical accounts, new mapping technologies, and on-the-ground topographical studies, this talk will discuss the reconstruction of the ancient battles of Phillipi and Pydna, inviting audience members to attempt their own reconstructions and interpretations.

"So What If It Really Happened? (Or Didn't?)"

Thursday, November 21

12 - 1 PM

Ramsey Library Special Collections

Lori Horvitz and Rachel Hanson, Department of English

"So What if it Really Happened? (Or Didn't?)"

Two creative nonfiction writers--Rachel Hanson and Lori Horvitz--will share their latest work and speak about issues/concerns about translating real-life events into art.