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D. Hiden Ramsey Library, University of North Carolina at Asheville

Events & Exhibits: 2020 Exhibits

Fall 2020 BA Student Senior Group Exhibition

BA Student Senior Group Exhibition Photo

Fall 2020 BA Student Senior Group Exhibition

On Exhibit: November 13th - 20th, 2020 in Ramsey Library's Blowers Gallery

Students will present a portion of their senior portfolio in Blower’s Gallery in Ramsey Library. This show is the last step for students to earn their Bachelor’s of Arts in Art. Students’ studio art concentrations include Ceramics, Drawing, Painting, Photography, Printmaking, and Sculpture. This year features the work of students Geddi Monroe, Indica Willis, Amahdi Stewart, and Cassidy Shaw.

Ascension: Stonewall to Orlando

Brent Skidmore's Ascension

Ascension: Stonewall to Orlando

Artist: Brent Skidmore

On Exhibit: November 9th - TBD 2021

In Ramsey Library's First Floor Grand Staircase Landing

Artist's description: Description: In 2016, after the shooting at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando , FL, I was processing great grief that related to my friends who have been continually challenged, threaten and even harmed because they are gay. Many of these friends have been huge pillars of my support and love that I call on often. One of these men I would credit with saving my life. As I write this, I am still overcome with sadness. I often move through these grief spaces by making art and during this summer I took the time to celebrate this community of people by making what I hope would be a celebration of ALL of their lives. I built this piece as a protective prayer for them all.

The Family Store - A History of Jewish Businesses in Downtown Asheville, 1880-1990

South Main Street Panel from Exhibit

The Family Store: A History of Jewish Businesses in Downtown Asheville, 1880-1990

On Exhibit: August 10 - November 27, 2020 in Ramsey Library's Blowers Gallery

Created by Jan Schochet and Sharon Fahrer, this exhibit "showcases a time when all downtowns were destinations of purpose, providing the items necessary for daily life, from groceries to clothing to restaurants." Previously the exhibit was located at sites around downtown Asheville, North Carolina where these former Jewish businesses used to thrive. Most of the documents, interviews and images used to create this exhibit are held in the Special Collections of D. H. Ramsey Library and were part of existing collections, or were donated as part of the research efforts of Schocket and Fahrer while creating The Family Store exhibit. Description from Special Collections' Web Exhibit, which is still available with all shown panels viewable online

Scribes: Work in Image and Text from the Goodyear Arts Collective

Scribes Exhibit Paintings Picture

Scribes: Work in Image and Text from the Goodyear Arts Collective

On Exhibit: March 1st - 31st, 2020 in Ramsey Library's Blowers Gallery

Reception: TBA

Exhibit Description: Image and text are the basic building blocks of meaning in visual language. Artists combine and contrast pictures and words to explore a wide array of possible meanings, to expand and expound on the way we “read” a work of art. The five artists in this exhibition, Amy Bagwell, Renee Cloud, D’Angelo Dia, Liliya Zalevskaya, and Jason Watson all play with image and text in their drawings, prints, designs, and installations. As active members of the Goodyear Arts Collective in Charlotte, NC, this show illustrates the many threads of their ongoing creative conversation. -Artist Jason Watson

MISSING: Stories of Urban Renewal in Asheville's Historic East End and Valley Street Neighborhoods

MiSSING Exhibit Poster Example

MISSING: Stories of Urban Renewal in Asheville's Historic East End and Valley Street Neighborhoods

On Exhibit: February 1st - 27th, 2020 in Ramsey Library's Blowers Gallery

"“Urban renewal” as a technical term dates back to the US Congress’s Housing Act of 1954, which granted the federal government authority to claim “blighted” properties from private owners and redevelop the land those properties occupied in the name of civic progress. Though many urban renewal projects were undertaken with the best of intentions, on the whole they resulted in the dislocation of millions from their homes and businesses, most powerfully affecting communities of color. MISSING, crafted by UNC Asheville students enrolled in Patrick Bahls’s first-year seminar on urban renewal, examines the impact of urban renewal on specific locations in the East End and Valley Street neighborhoods of Asheville, neighborhoods among several local predominantly African American neighborhoods impacted by urban renewal during the 1960s, ‘70s, and ‘80s." -Professor Patrick Bahls

A Progressive Escape by Greg Vineyard

Greg Vineyard Painting

A Progressive Escape by Greg Vineyard

On Exhibit: January 2nd - 31st, 2020 in Ramsey Library's Blowers Gallery

"My conceptual illustrations are often inspired by current events, daily life observation, societal behaviors, psychology, and nature. "A Progressive Escape" is a visual interpretation of one lifespan, energetically displaying the duality of simplicity and chaos, and ultimately an arrival at some form of peace. While I don't personally view death itself as an "escape," I do think that if we're lucky, each stage of a life can provide some relief from whatever came before. As has often been said, life is about the experiences along the way, which I do think are cumulative." -Artist Greg Vineyard